Sunday, July 11, 2010

Alvin Silver Bridal Rose Pattern

I love to hear from my customers. As each piece of paper goes out the door I wonder what drove the buyer. What was the charm? the connection?

Sometimes I am lucky enough to get a little note to let me know. I woke up to this one:

Dear Beth, I have been collecting Alvin's Bridal Rose silver for decades. My parents inherited three pieces. .When that was left to me, I fell in love with the pattern. I knew that one day, I would find an antique ad. My husband & I are very grateful to you for helping us add the missing link to our collection!!! Gorham owns the molds for Bridal Rose now, & sometimes you can get some pieces. The serving pieces are very expensive. I am glad I am not looking for them now.

The Alvin Silver Manufacturing Co was founded during the latter part of the 19th century. The original headquarters in 1886 was located in New Jersey. The company was known for manufacturing not only fine sterling silver flatware but also for hollowaare and toiletware. In 1895 the company relocated from New Jersey to Sag Harbor, NY where it began manufacturing popular silverware based on historical patterns..

Introduced in 1903, "Bridal Rose" by Alvin Silver is an exquisite art nouveau pattern that features a rose in full-bloom at its tip with crisp, detailed leaves and stems running the length of the handle. With its elegant, detailed ornamentation, "Bridal Rose" quickly became one of the most popular turn-of-the-century patterns after its introduction. During its prime, the "Bridal Rose" pattern comprised a full line of over 180 different pieces.

And of course more silver ads are available at The Old Ad Store



Thursday, July 8, 2010

WWII Ads & Hitler, Tojo & Mussolini

Well, WWII was a terrible time for this nation. My Dad was part of that Great Generation and fought in the Pacific. Why am I thinking about this? My 1943 Fortune magazine collection. See more like this at the Old Ad Store


I am reading the entire year during the evenings and reviewing advertisements. Our nation was amazing! Americans decided to do whatever it took to defeat the Axis nations. Industry mobilized and dedicated 100% of peacetime activities to manufacturing for soldiers.

I found that many companies used depictions of Hitler, Tojo and Mussolini in their ads.

The one to the left here is for Asbestos. At that time (and maybe now for all I know) there were only a few countries that had the raw materials necessary for asbestos...and they were all Anti-Axis. So no asbestos for German, Japan and Italy.

This illustration is by Arthur Szyk and the colors are gorgeous.

The Container Corporation of America (CCA) employed some of the greatest illustrators of the time including Jean Carlu.


This next ad is a CCA that is dropping a bomb on Hitler. It is captioned: Gift Packages for Hitler. There he is at the bottom of the page with a bomb headed for his nose.

Young Rubicam had an ad campaign that encouraged Americans not to believe, support or spread rumors. They wrote that rumor mongering was an important activity of the enemy.

Here is an ad that illustrates the concept.

Saturday, June 12, 2010

Coastal Living Supports Decorating with Vintage Ads


My sister-in-law loves everything to do with the beach and island life. So no surprise that she subscribes to Coastal Living. In the latest issues there is an article by Susan Stiles Dowell titled Treasure Hunt.

In the article she polled experts from TV's Antiques Roadshow to learn their recommendations for beach house decor.

One of the recommendations is Vintage Ads and illustrations with a nautical theme expecially the old luxury liner ads! Well I cannot agree more!

Here is a 1906 Southern Pacific ad showing the steamship Monus. This is from the magazine Country Life in America.




Hamburg American Cruises were very popular in the early 1900's and usually had an exotic theme. This ad from 1909 invites travel to South America and the West Indies. Note the camel in the upper right hand corner.

Here you see a couple being told a great story by their guide. Lovely colors and a real sense of adventure here.



You may not want to go the early 1900s but instead incorporate art deco nautical ads from the 1920's. Or the lovely photo ads popular by the cruise ships in the 1930s


Black and white ads can be more dramatic for decorating especially when you are using accents in the room which are the pop of color.


You don't want the vintage advertising competing.
Find wonderful vintage cruise ads at The Old Ad Store


Saturday, May 22, 2010

Fairies, Imps and Elves in Vintage Advertising

Many old ads featured little fairies, imps, and elves. Some were funny and many were beautiful or whimsical. You can find these ads at The Old Ad Store

Here is a very pretty ad for Fairy soap with Fairies riding bumblebees from a November 1899 Harper's magazine.

The ad reads: The Fairies bring their choicest gift.

Pears' had a similar themed ad in 1898 that has three winged babies bringing the soap. But are they angels, fairies or cupids?





Elves and brownies were used by illustrators to advertise
soap. Here is a cute ad from Punch magazine. Some of these would be very cute silk-screen on to hand towels don't you think?

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

I've gone to the Dogs!


It had to happen. My most unusual sale to date...decorating a dog house. Well, a "boarding bungalow". How much fun was it to find ads for this doggy day care? Lots. I got to visit the location, decide on brands and breeds and play with this dog.

Could your business use a little vintage advertising? Probably, and here is the place to fine it:
The Old Ad Store

Sunday, May 16, 2010

That's my House

Lately I have been asking customers to send me their stories as to how they are connected to their ads. As I have mentioned earlier a lot of times it is a relative in the ad or the family business.

A couple of weeks ago I had a customer buy a real estate ad and she had a special reason for doing so...it was her house. Now the ad was from 1904. That is 106 years ago. Wow...

Thank you Angela and here's to you and your Very Old House.

What about you? Do you think Country Life magazine listed your house for sale 100 years ago?

Here are the ads:

The Old Ad Store


Saturday, May 8, 2010

That's my Grandfather


One of the fun aspects of selling vintage advertising online is discovering folks relatives. At least once a month I get an email that Uncle Freddy or Great Grandpa Nelson is in that ad I am selling. Or like the ad to the right John Cott, Cott Beverages. Here is a little secret...I know that.

No I don't know that your grandfather and grandmother started a tire company in Camden NJ. What I do know is that when an ad has an individual in it by name, then there is a good chance there is a relative somewhere googling that same name.

And how much fun is it when my ad pops up and there is sweet Sue your cousin's older sisters first teacher? Who married....well you get my drift.

Google your name, your grandparents name, etc. Then click on the shopping tab. See what you get!

Or search my shops:
The Old Ad Store